Remains of past industry

Just a short twist-the-ankles and stub-the-toes from the beach of Barreiro, lurk some of the industrial remains of this small city. They are well hidden by the Spring greenery, but the tall mill towers give it away

Situated on the opposite side of the Tejo from Lisbon, this city was a hub of tide mills, cork factories, fabric mills, ship and train production, explosives and even chewing gum.

Going back to the age of discoveries this area was a key place for ship building. It is pretty certain that Vasco da Gama came here to oversee the production of his ships. And he was certainly here in June 1880, when his bones, along with those of CamΓ΅es, were transferred to the JerΓ³nimos monastery. They arrived in Barreiro by train and were then transported ceremonially across the Tejo to JerΓ³nimos.

Life here has changed through the centuries, with windmills left to decay, factories closed and much industry relocated.

This site has had a varied history, owned in its early days by a gold merchant responsible for establishing many of the tide mills in town. In the early nineteenth century, he sold this mill to Venceslau Braamcamp, and it became known as Moinho do Braamcamp. He expanded the number of tide mills and also developed a farm for the creation of silkworms.

Moinho do Braamcamp, Barreiro, Portugal, March 2020

After his ownership it passed to his son and later went through a number of changes of hands, and an almost matching number of changes of uses. It was home to a cork factory, a biscuit producer, and had a number of other industrial uses.

It has been through tough times since the second World War, and the cork factory was finally made insolvent in 2008. It was then left to its own devices, with its dilapidation speeded up in 2011 by arson, which destroyed several buildings and killed the palm trees.

The area has since been acquired with the intention of renovation and repurposing, but progress is awaited. For now, it sits there in an attractive position, with views across to Lisbon, and is well worth some exploration.

I was delighted to discover Barreiro – an interesting town so close to Lisbon. If you’d like a local to guide you around the area, including these industrial remains, pop over to Lisboa’te Tours, where Raquel will be happy to give you a tour.


aDSC_0636_pp

 

Copyright Debbie Smyth, 31 March 2020

Posted as part of Monday Walks

25 thoughts on “Remains of past industry

  1. Love your pictures of remnants of the past. It looks like a great place to wander around and visit. Thanks for posting this article.

    Like

    1. I’ve started booking at least one tour with a local everywhere I go. Airbnb are particularly good at offering something different at a decent price. I’ll give links to the people I’ve used when get back to the possibility of using them!

      Like

  2. One day it will be an apartment complex, Debs, so I’m glad you found this place in its neglected state. The photos are beautiful and we both know a certain lady who we could happily leave there with her camera for a week. πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ Though maybe not the safest environment for her. There are many such places in Portugal, but I doubt if there are any with a better location. Thanks so much for a brilliant share.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. No, sadly rough terrain. But, as you say, the whole of Portugal has such gems. I’m glad it was my last trip before this break. And I might well make it my first once travel is possible again πŸ™‚

      Like

        1. Queuing outside the post office right now. Don’t know if my Easter cards have a hope in hell of getting to Poland but I can try. Long walk thru the salt marshes this morning. Put my feet up time soon. No cake! πŸ˜’πŸ’•

          Like

    1. It’s on my return to list. I was in a hurry as was flying home that afternoon – otherwise I’d have had a more leisurely amble and a lunch in very appealing waterfront restaurant that I spotted.

      Liked by 3 people

Come join the conversation:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.