Looking up at romanity

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Musée de la Romanité, Nîmes, August 2018 – at night

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This new history museum sits opposite the Roman amphitheatre in Nîmes: modern architecture with squares, angles and light materials contrasting with the solidity and curves of the ancient structure.

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during the day

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Elizabeth de Portzamparc, the designer of the museum, deliberately chose to give her building a feeling of lightness and levitation, using 6,708 glass tiles on an undulating stainless steel frame, creating a drapery effect that might suggest a Roman toga.

Inside there are excellent exhibitions on the Roman history of the area, well worth the visit. Once you have absorbed the stories it tells, you can look out at the amphitheatre, through the squinting eye windows, and from the roof garden.

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Copyright Debbie Smyth,  30 September 2018

Posted as part of Lens-Artists

15 thoughts on “Looking up at romanity

    1. I know what you mean. I think it is often hard for us to accept modern alongside ancient. But it didn’t give me an issue when I saw it in reality – you can easily enjoy each one in its own right. And each provides a view to the other.

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