Turia in full flow in Valencia

The Turia River flows from the Montes Universales, down through the Spanish provinces of Teruel, Cuenca and Valencia, to the Mediterranean.

It used to run through the centre of Valencia, where its regular floods became a growing issue. In 1957 a massive flood caused many deaths, plus huge damage to the city, and the decision was taken to reroute the river around the city. The former river bed is now a pleasant garden, whilst the river passes partly through underground irrigation channels, and partly along a new course to the south of the city.

In Plaza de la Virgen, in the centre of Valencia, however, there is a tribute to the river in the form of a huge fountain. Sitting in the middle of the feature, clutching the Horn of Plenty, is an imposing figure representing the Río Turia. Around him stand eight naked women carrying pots of flowing water. The maidens bear the names Benager, Faitanar, Rovella, Favara, Quart, Tormos, Rascanya, Mislata and Mestalla, playing the part of the eight irrigation channels of the river. Geographical differences come into play, with each one pointing her water flow in different directions and from different heights.

Fuente del Turia, Valencia, July 2019

Below is a slideshow of the damage caused by the 1957 flood:


aDSC_0636_pp

 

Copyright Debbie Smyth, 24 September 2020

Posted as part of Cee’s B&W

9 thoughts on “Turia in full flow in Valencia

  1. I am quite a fan of the Turia gardens – when you think that there was quite a lobby gunning for the former river course becoming a motorway, it’s quite inspired . Unlike That Statue, which might be just about OK if it had come from another century…..

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    1. Indeed. He is lazing around while the naked maidens do all the hard work. And whilst many know nothing about the role of the women, they automatically assume that he is Neptune. I could go on! Needless to say. it was designed by a man, and only in the 1970s.

      Liked by 1 person

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